Projects

DEEP
University Activities Board
packHOWL
Matter of Fact
Virtual MLK Project
State Farmers Market
MISHMASH

Information

Karuna Gangwani is a graphic designer based in Raleigh, NC. She is currently a junior studying Graphic Design at North Carolina State University, with interests in experience design and branding.

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Virtual MLK Project

Spring 2020 | Identity + Exhibit

Identity and spatial graphics designed for an exhibit dedicated to making Civil Rights history more tangible and nuanced

Collaborators

Lindsay Caslin, Ann Salman, Molly Mills, Angela Zhong







Project overview

The Virtual MLK Project is a multi-faceted experience to celebrate the 60th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s widely influential speech titled, “A Creative Protest.” The research presented throughout the exhibit, along with the Virtual Reality experience, provides an embodied sense of what it might have been like to sit, stand, and move around the historic sanctuary during King's speech.

Proposal + Process Book ︎︎︎


Deliverables

  1. Simplified Exhibit Experience

  2. New Visual Identity System

  3. Promotional Material

  4. Exhibit Touchpoint Stands

  5. Wayfinding Brochure




Previous Exhibit Design

In order to properly assess what was needed in the exhibit, we developed a journey map that parsed through all the possible ways users would navigate the exhibit as it was functioning before. 

Pain Points

  1. Impossible to navigate without a tour guide

  2. Lack of prominent exhibit graphics

  3. No indicator of a beginning and end







Revising the exhibit

We streamlined the user journey and made spatial mockups (physical and digital) to iterate what the exhibit could look like.

Our resolutions

  1. An identity cohesive with Hunt Library’s environment

  2. Clear wayfinding system

  3. Revised exhibit chronology that enhanced the exhibit’s narrative






The identity emphasizes amplification as its core value, as the exhibit’s intent is to amplify pieces of Civil Rights history that are often unheard.






The wayfinding relies on signage placed within Hunt Library’s space and corresponding iconography.